Issue No. 2

November 22, 2016

Dinosaur, Dragon or Durable Defence: Deterrence in the 21st Century, A summary of perspectives on nuclear deterrence

The past 25 years have seen significant changes in security environments – nationally, regionally and globally – that impact on nuclear weapons policies and practices. These include, inter alia, the end of the Cold War (followed by periods of fluctuating relationships between the U.S. and …

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Nuclear Deterrence: A Dialogue between Richard Falk and David Krieger

“Opponents of nuclear deterrence need a credible alternative that seems safer, cheaper, and more in accord with the values embedded in Western and other world civilizations, including respect for international law, while at the same time upholding national security as generally understood.” “Nuclear deterrence is …

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November 21, 2016

Nuclear Deterrence and a Trans-generational Framework

Introduction When U.S. President Barack Obama announced on 9 April 2009 in Prague his vision for a nuclear weapons-free world, but indicated that this might not be achieved in his lifetime, he advanced a trans-generational framework uncommon in political leaders – most of whom can …

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November 21, 2016

Nuclear Deterrence and Changing the Framework of the Debate: Obtaining National Self Interests by Advancing Global Public Goods

Twenty-first century security challenges are numerous, complex, and, more often than not, interconnected. At their core, each of these most pressing challenges requires cooperation and collective action. Persistent military competition and violence, along with less-than-adequate international security infrastructure, undermine efforts to cooperatively address these challenges. …

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November 21, 2016

Nuclear Deterrence, NATO and the Role of Parliamentarians

The new NATO Strategic Concept (November 2010) and the Defence and Deterrence Posture Review (May 2012) are rather disappointing. In March 2010 the Deutsche Bundestag (German Parliament) passed a resolution sponsored by all parties (except the Left), that dealt with the future of nuclear weapons. …

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September 21, 2016

Nuclear Deterrence: Not Suitable for the 21st Century

PAUL QUILÈS Some 23 years ago the Berlin Wall fell. This major event, followed by the dismantlement of the Soviet bloc, put an end to a bipolar world and caused fundamental upheaval on the international scene. Yet no new security doctrine has emerged from this profound …

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September 21, 2016

Taming Godzilla: Nuclear Deterrence in North-East Asia

ALYN WARE, KIHO HI, HIROMICHI UMEBAYASHI Godzilla, a giant monster mutated by nuclear radiation, first appears in a 1954 Japanese science fiction movie by the same name, ravaging Japan in a symbolic warning about the risks of nuclear weapons. Since then Godzilla has appeared in …

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September 21, 2016

Untangling Japan’s Nuclear Dilemma: Deterrence before Disarmament

NOBUYASU ABE  AND HIROFUMI TOSAKI Introduction In his historic Prague speech in 2009, President Barack Obama committed the United States to take concrete steps towards a world without nuclear weapons while maintaining a safe, secure and effective nuclear arsenal for deterrence and reassurance as long …

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September 21, 2016

From Unilateral to Multilateral

Someone has to take the first step. The journey to multilateral action on nuclear disarmament is proving a longer road than those who established the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) had envisioned. As a result nuclear weapon proliferation has established a significant foothold with Israel, India, Pakistan …

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September 21, 2016

Identifying Principles for a Nuclear Weapons-Free World: The Rajiv Gandhi Action Plan as a Relevant Guide

MANPREET SETHI Since its birth as a nation state in 1947, India has never wavered in its desire for a nuclear weapons-free world (NWFW). Over nearly six and a half long decades, the country has presented several proposals and introduced many resolutions – some spanning …

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